Monthly Archives: September 2011

Liposuction Benefits May Include Lowering Cholesterol

Liposuction benefitsLiposuction may have benefits beyond a smaller waistline, if new research stands up, according to the Los Angeles Times.

In addition to slimming your most troublesome body parts, liposuction benefits may include ridding your blood of some harmful fat elements, namely triglycerides. While your body needs some level of triglycerides, a high level of them can lead to heart disease and other cardiovascular ailments.

This new research found that while those with normal levels of triglyceride experienced no change following liposuction, those with high levels of triglycerides saw the additional liposuction benefits. In fact, three months after their liposuction procedure, patients with the highest levels of triglycerides saw a 43% reduction in triglycerides. Continue reading

Plastic Surgeons Respond to USA TODAY Investigation

Surgeons Explain the Distinction Between Hospitals and Outpatient Cosmetic Surgery Facilities

Last week, USA TODAY ran a front-page story and series of articles that explored risks of cosmetic surgery performed at “low cost, high volume” clinics.

A quote from the article titled “Cosmetic Surgery Gets Cheaper, Faster, Scarier

“While these centers typically employ board-certified plastic surgeons, some don’t have privileges to treat patients at hospitals, leaving patients to fend for themselves at emergency rooms. Soto says she now wishes she had her procedure performed at a hospital rather than an outpatient surgical center “so that if anything happened I was already there.”

But is a hospital the answer to all safety concerns? We asked several respected plastic surgeons to respond to this question. Continue reading

Surgical Adhesive to Seek FDA Approval by Year’s End

A new surgical adhesive may improve patient healing after plastic surgery, according to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

Most often when patients who undergo a procedure like a body lift, in which excess fat and skin are removed circumferentially around the midsection, the incisions are closed with sutures. A side effect of a surgery like this is that fluid can build up in the areas around the sutures. As such, patients must often wear surgical drains for days and sometimes even weeks following treatment. This can leave the incision open for infection and the tubes themselves can be bothersome for patients. Continue reading